Friday, 18 September 2015

FIFA suspends Blatter’s ally over ticket scandal

FIFA suspends Blatter’s ally over ticket scandal
FIFA General Secretary Jerome Valcke looks on during a press conference following hearings over bribery allegations at the football's world governing body FIFA Headquarters on May 29, 2011 in Zurich. FIFA suspends Mohamed bin Hammam and Jack Warner and decided to go ahead with the upcoming presidential election.     AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI
FIFA General Secretary Jerome Valcke looks on during a press conference following hearings over bribery allegations at the football's world governing body FIFA Headquarters on May 29, 2011 in Zurich. FIFA suspends Mohamed bin Hammam and Jack Warner and decided to go ahead with the upcoming presidential election. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI

FIFA suspends Blatter’s ally over ticket scandal

World soccer governing body, FIFA, on Thursday stripped top executive Jerome Valcke of his duties after allegations emerged connecting the 54-year-old to a plan to sell World Cup tickets for more than their face value.
Valcke, who works closely with FIFA President Sepp Blatter, has denied the allegations, which according to the Guardian, were made by a ticketing partner of FIFA’s official hospitality agency for the 2014 tournament.
After learning of the allegations Thursday, FIFA acted quickly.
“FIFA today announced that its Secretary General Jerome Valcke has been put on leave and released from his duties effective immediately until further notice,” the organization said in a statement. “Further, FIFA has been made aware of a series of allegations involving the Secretary General and has requested a formal investigation by the FIFA Ethics Committee.”
Cornel Borbely, the Ethics Committee’s lead investigator, will lead the investigation, the Guardian reports.
Read also: Corruption scandal: FIFA begs sponsors not to pull out
It has been a rough week for FIFA, which made headlines earlier this week when U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said she expects more indictments to come in an ongoing American-led investigation into corruption at the organization.
Already, 20 individuals have been indicted in connection with the $150 million bribery scheme, including three FIFA vice presidents and other former executives.
Neither Valcke nor Blatter have been connected to the U.S. case yet, although they still could be, according to Lynch.
“Our message is clear: no individual is impervious to the law. No corrupt organization is beyond its reach,” Lynch said, speaking in Zurich where FIFA is headquartered. “And no criminal act can evade the concerted efforts of dedicated men and women fighting for justice.”